BACKWATERS, KERALA

Backwaters

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The romantic and unique Backwaters of Kerala are made up of a labyrinth of canals and lakes that stream between Cochin and Quilon in the south. From the vastness of Lake Vembanad to quiet streams just large enough for a canoe, the Backwaters form the arteries through which rural daily life calmly flows – children splashing in the water, women washing clothes at the water’s edge, fishermen, neck deep in water digging out fish with their feet, rice barges transporting coconuts and rice and, above all, an overriding sense of peace and tranquility that permeates every aspect of this region. Traditional rice barges have now been converted into houseboats which gently roam the lake, allowing one to unwind, relax, enjoy a delicious meal, read a book and simply watch the world go by. For the more adventurous, it is possible to enjoy a full or half day kayaking trip on the Backwaters, venturing into the smaller canals which the larger houseboats can’t get into.

Experiences In And Around Backwaters

Culinary
Rural Cycling
Village Experience
Boat Ride

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The romantic and unique Backwaters of Kerala are made up of a labyrinth of canals and lakes that stream between Cochin and Quilon in the south. From the vastness of Lake Vembanad to quiet streams just large enough for a canoe, the Backwaters from the arteries through which rural daily life calmly flows – children splashing in the water, women washing clothes at the water’s edge, fishermen, neck-deep in water digging out fish with their feet, rice barges transporting coconuts and rice and, above all, an overriding sense of peace and tranquility that permeates every aspect of this region.
For many travellers, Kerala is South India’s most serenely beautiful state. A slender coastal strip is shaped by its layered landscape: almost 600km of glorious Arabian Sea coast and beaches; a languid network of glistening backwaters; and the spice- and tea-covered hills of the Western Ghats.
An aerial view of Kochi (formerly Cochin) and its surrounds provides a lush, vibrant green panorama of coconut trees, paddy fields, undulating hills, with meandering rivers and waterways. The city, made in three parts is located at the juncture where backwaters join the Arabian Sea. The Fort area is where most people flock to, and understandably so, it is made up of a mélange of buildings, left by the different influences on the region, Dutch, British and Portuguese and of course the Chinese Fishing Nets.